Tag Archives: Leveson Inquiry

Rupert Murdoch’s Last Hurrah

Recently, Rupert Murdoch held a Christmas party to celebrate his return to the UK political scene.[1] Commentators noted that half of the UK Cabinet was present. For many observers the event marked a triumph for Murdoch. After the bad publicity … Continue reading

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The dark arts continue: The deeper lesson from Operation Alice.

At the Leveson Inquiry, we heard about the dark arts practice by the tabloids and other papers. The arts describe all the ways, legal and illegal, that the tabloids used to gather information. The dark arts included hacking phones, digging … Continue reading

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Phone hacking: the political blackmail that corrupts British Politics

The report by Media Standards Trust “Who was hacked?” paints a bleak picture of British politics.[1] Even though the average citizen was unaffected by the phone hacking, most victims were public figures or related to public events usually a tragedy … Continue reading

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Unasked questions about national security and phone hacking

Since the Leveson Inquiry and the Phone Hacking trial, a number of unasked and unanswered questions have emerged. These questions are around phone hacking and national security. Peter Clarke became involved because the phone hacking had compromised the Royal Family … Continue reading

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Is the UK politics decided by a praetorian guard of police and press?

The press, politicians and the police are often considered guardians of the public interest. In Operation Alice[1] report, though, we see how that role became perverted. We find that officers leaked information to the press to force a minister to … Continue reading

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Plebgate, Operation Alice, and the Post Leveson landscape

In the Plebgate affair, we saw several interconnected events that reminded us why Leveson was needed and what has changed as a result. Operation Alice upset the press. Police officers lied. Police undermined a democratically elected minister. Police appeared to … Continue reading

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 The new establishment: Leveson, hacking and the public voice

Before the Leveson inquiry, the public face of the establishment had three interconnected parts: the press, the police, and the politicians. They had a complicated relationship. Each reinforced the other’s power even as they sought to exploit the relationship. However, … Continue reading

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